Vegan Keto Diet Meal Plan and Grocery List

The ketogenic diet is a low-carb, moderate-protein and high-fat that helps put the body in a metabolic state known as ketosis. When the body enters a state of ketosis, it starts to use fat for fuel — a reason why this diet is closely linked to weight loss.

If you’re vegan, following a vegan ketogenic diet meal plan can be a little tricky. As the diet includes a moderate amount of protein, high amounts of fat, and very little carbohydrates, you’ll need to carefully count your macros and reduce the number of high-carb fruits, veggies and legumes you eat.

At this point in time, the 8fit meal plan doesn’t support the ketogenic diet. If you’re interested in reducing the number of carbs you consume, sign up for 8fit and exclude some high-carb foods like pasta, grains and high-carb veggies. Your meal plan will automatically adjust to suit your new eating habits and ingredient preferences by pulling low-carb recipes into your weekly plan.

What is the keto diet?

The ketogenic diet daily meal plan consists of 70-75% fat, 20-25% protein, and 5-10% carbs. For an average person who requires 2,000 calories per day, that equates to a maximum of 50 grams of carbs per day. This number will vary based on your gender, current weight, activity level and personal metabolism.

 

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Each body is different, so it’s hard to predict exactly when the body will switch from depending on carbohydrates for energy to burning fats for fuel. For some individuals it could take two days, for others it could take up to 14 days. There are ways to quickly enter a state of ketosis — one is by fasting for 24-48 hours before the diet begins and another is by restricting your daily carbohydrates to 5% of your caloric intake.

You’ll know that you’ve entered a state of ketosis when you experience one or more of the following:

  • Keto breath: When your body starts to break down fat for fuel, acetone is produced. This acetone can be detected in the breath — the smell is fruity or sometimes metallic scented.
  • Increased thirst and dry mouth: Thirst will increase in a state of ketosis because the body starts to use up excess glycogen, which holds onto water, leading to an increased the need for urination.
  • Ketones present in urine: Using a ketone stip (like Ketostix) can help detect ketones in the urine, confirming that your body has indeed entered a state of ketosis.

Ketogenic diet benefits and cautions

As we mentioned above, there are a number of benefits in favor of a ketogenic diet — but there are also a number of side effects to be aware of. In many cases, doctors “prescribe” a ketogenic diet as a short-term treatment for conditions like glucose regulation, early Type 2 diabetes, hypertension or chronic inflammation.

The ketogenic diet can help many people eat more nutritious meals full of healthy fats and proteins. If done correctly, it can also reduce insulin levels, burn fat, lead to weight loss and help you detox from sugar (we have a 21-day plan for that).

That might sound great, but there are also some reasons to be cautious. First, always consult your doctor before giving keto a go to make sure it’s the right nutritional plan for you. During a ketogenic diet, insulin levels go down and, as a result, your body sheds excess sodium and water. This will lead to reduced bloat, but could also cause dehydration, fatigue, lightheadedness, headaches and constipation. Low sodium and electrolyte levels also lead to muscle weakness, irregular heartbeat and changes in blood pressure. Another thing to watch when trying keto is your carbohydrate intake. If you work out regularly, your body requires more carbohydrates.

What can you eat on a ketogenic diet?

Before we dive into what to eat on a vegan ketogenic diet, here’s a basic overview of what to eat on a standard ketogenic diet. Be sure to include these ingredients in your meal plan:

  • Fat: Fatty fish, butter, avocado, plant-based oils, nuts and seeds
  • Healthy protein: Beef, poultry, fish, eggs
  • Carbohydrates: Tomato, broccoli, onion, kale, spinach, brussels sprouts and raspberries

Be cautious when adding fruits and vegetables to your meals. There are a number of fruits and veggies that are high on the glycemic index. This means they contain high amounts of sugar (sugars are carbs, too). Avoid these foods when on a ketogenic diet:

  • High-carb fruits: Bananas, clementines, apples, kiwis and blueberries
  • All grains: Whole wheat breads, quinoa, oats and corn
  • Processed, natural and artificial sugars: White sugar, cane sugar, agave, honey, maple syrup, Equal and Splenda

 

vegan ketogenic diet salad

Overview of the vegan ketogenic diet

You might have noticed a lot of animal-based proteins in the “what to eat on a ketogenic diet” list. Many of vegans’ go-to sources of protein like beans and legumes are off-limits because they put you over the recommended range of carbohydrates per day. That said, soy-based proteins and high-protein veggies like spinach, kale, broccoli, sprouts, mushrooms and brussels sprouts are still allowed.

Reaching to a state of ketosis on a vegan diet requires careful macronutrient calculation, so it’s often best to consult a doctor, nutritionist or dietician.

Vegan ketogenic diet food list: What foods to eat and avoid

The vegan ketogenic diet food list looks quite similar to the standard ketogenic diet food list — minus the beef, poultry, eggs and fish. Here are foods to avoid:

  • High-carb fruits: Bananas, clementines, apples, kiwis and blueberries
  • All grains: Whole wheat breads, quinoa, oats and corn
  • Processed, natural and artificial sugars: White sugar, cane sugar, agave, honey, maple syrup, Equal and Splenda
  • Tubers: Potatoes, taro and yams
  • Legumes: Lentils, black beans, peas and chickpeas

Here is a list of vegan keto-friendly foods to eat:

  • Fat: Coconut oil, coconut cream/milk, avocado, plant-based oils, nuts and seeds
  • Healthy protein: Nut-based yogurts, soy proteins and high-protein veggies
  • Carbohydrates: Tomatoes, broccoli, onion, kale, spinach, brussels sprouts and raspberries

 

vegan ketogenic meal plan burger

Vegan keto diet grocery list

Ready to go shopping? Here is a vegan keto diet grocery list to take along. The list is broken up by macronutrient, but there is some overlap when it comes to foods like nuts and seeds as they contain fat and protein. When buying packaged foods like tofu, tempeh and seitan, read ingredient labels to make sure there are no added sugars.

Vegan keto proteins

  • Tofu
  • Tempeh
  • Seitan
  • Dairy-free yogurt (high-fat)

Vegan keto fats

  • Nuts like pistachios and almonds
  • Seeds like hemp seeds, sunflower seeds and pumpkin seeds
  • Avocado
  • Plant-based oil like coconut oil, olive oil or hemp oil

Vegan keto carbohydrates

  • Leafy greens like kale and spinach
  • Mushrooms like shiitake, lion’s mane and oyster
  • Berries like blackberries and raspberries
  • Vegetables like broccoli, cauliflower and zucchini

Raw vegan ketogenic diet

Turning your vegan ketogenic meal plan into a raw vegan ketogenic one isn’t too tricky. Instead of cooking or roasting veggies, nuts and seeds, consume them raw. To make leafy greens more appealing and digestible, massage them with a plant-based oil before serving. Finally, if you’re struggling to get the correct ratio of protein in your daily diet, consider a raw vegan protein supplement (Garden of Life and Sunwarrior brands offer these powders).

Bottom line

As with any drastic diet change, do extensive research and consult your doctor before you begin. Remember that a ketogenic diet has its benefits, but there are also reasons to proceed with caution. If your goal is to lose weight, consider trying an 8fit low-carb meal plan first. You’ll develop healthy, sustainable habits without giving up the foods you love.